Interesting Facts about Drones

1. Attack Drones are controlled by More Than One Person

Attack Drones are controlled by More Than One Person

Although drones are often portrayed as autonomous or requiring only one person to operate, many military drones actually require dozens of people working in tandem to function. In other words, drones with advanced attack capabilities require a larger number of personnel to operate.

2. Israel is at the Forefront of Drone Technology Development

Israel is at the Forefront of Drone Technology Development

Israel is the first country to invent drones, not the USA. Israel Aerospace Industries has its production facilities in various countries around the world. The first drone was built before World War II by Britain. Since then, many countries have built drones, but none as advanced as Israel. The country has spent a lot of money on its research and development on drones, which are now being sold all over the world. [1]

3. US Citizens Own the Most Civilian Drones

US Citizens Own the Most Civilian Drones

The FAA estimates that there are more than 372,000 registered commercial drones in the United States. The FAA requires that all drones weighing 0.55 pounds or more be registered. Drone owners who do not register their devices with the FAA risk fines of $27,500 and/or imprisonment for up to three years if caught. [2] [3]

4. There’s a Racing League Called Drone Racing League

There’s a Racing League Called Drone Racing League

The Drone Racing League (DRL) is an American-based drone racing league that operates worldwide. DRL pilots fly FPV drones through three-dimensional courses, reaching speeds of up to 80 MPH. The company produces and hosts races and distributes its content to consumers via television, social media, and its website.

DRL was founded by Nicholas Horbaczewski in January 2015, who has served as the company’s CEO since its formation. The company has raised $32 million in venture capital funding from Lux Capital, Hearst Ventures, CAA Ventures, and other investors. [4]

5. A Drone Crashed Onto the White House Lawn in January 2015

A Drone Crashed Onto the White House Lawn in January 2015

The most newsworthy drone incident was a small, recreational quadcopter that flew through restricted airspace and crashed on the lawn of the White House. The flight controller was a federal government employee who was having trouble sleeping (for obvious reasons after the event). The drone’s owner was fined $2,000 for his carelessness. However, the charges were later dropped because it was just an accident [5].

6. Cost of Making Predator and Reaper

Cost of Making Predator and Reaper

Making the Predator and Reaper drones is a very expensive endeavor. The cost of making one Predator drone has been estimated at $4.5 go $11 million each, while the Reaper costs approximately $30 million.

7. Drones can Reach Places That Were Previously Inaccessible

Drones can Reach Places That Were Previously Inaccessible

Drones can reach places that were previously inaccessible. They are safer than humans in dangerous situations. The same applies to telecommunications, mining operations, and oil rigs.

The drone can map out the entire infrastructure of a mine. It can also monitor the health of equipment in real-time. Drones can also be used for inspecting power lines and pipelines. As a result, companies can do their tasks with less cost and manpower.

8. You cannot Fly in No Drone Zones

You cannot Fly in No Drone Zones

Before operating a drone, you should familiarize yourself with the areas where unmanned aircraft are prohibited. In the United States, these areas are called restricted airspace and are monitored by the FAA as “No Drone Zones.”

9. Police Do Not Need a Warrant to Use a Drone

Police Do Not Need a Warrant to Use a Drone

The drone has become an established tool in the police’s arsenal. These machines are relatively inexpensive and easy to use, which means that local law enforcement can use them for a variety of purposes — including surveillance. But, police do not need the warrant to fly a drone. As long as the drone is flying in public airspace, there’s nothing to prevent law enforcement from using it without getting a court order first. [6]

However, one of the biggest concerns about police drones is their effect on privacy. If a drone is flying over your home, it could easily monitor your activity — even if you’re inside your house. While the Fourth Amendment protects your home against “unreasonable searches and seizures,” it doesn’t apply when you’re in public.

10. Armed Drones Were Made for a Purpose

Armed Drones Were Made for a Purpose

Undoubtedly, armed drones have been the most important invention in the last few years. They have changed the whole concept of warfare and have made it extremely easy to counter threats. Armed drones have become so common now that they can be seen in almost all parts of the world. Therefore, it is not surprising to see them being used by different countries.

The most common use of drones is to help in surveillance activities. This means that they are used for spying on other people or things. These activities help gather intelligence and other important information that the military can use to track down their enemies or stop them from getting into trouble.

For example, to track down Osama bin Laden in 1998, the United States military made use of armed drones to search for him in the Middle East. [7]

11. You Can Find Drones As Small As A Bee And As Large As A Helicopter

You Can Find Drones As Small As A Bee And As Large As A Helicopter

Some drones are small enough to sit on your palm, while others can be larger than a truck. This is because drones are used for different purposes, and the weight of the drone depends on its purpose and size.

Drones are mainly used for photography and videography, although some drones are used for surveillance, delivery of goods and services, monitoring hazards and weather conditions, etc.

12. Drones are used for Patrolling

Drones are used for Patrolling

Drones aren’t just used by the US army. They have been used by the US and other governments to patrol borders to prevent the smuggling of illegal aliens, drugs, and weapons into the country. In addition, drones also help find lost hikers and missing persons by carrying heat sensors and infrared equipment. They also use drones in US airspace for border patrolling.

13. Human Rights Activists are Highly against Drones

Human Rights Activists are Highly against Drones

Many human rights activists are highly against drones because they threaten their privacy and personal life. These drones can easily intrude into one’s personal life and invade people’s privacy. Government can use these drones for their benefit and can monitor the activities of the common people without their knowledge.

According to a report by Human Rights Watch, drone aircraft have killed more than 4,000 people in Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen since 2002. The United States military has targeted a small number of militants, but mostly it is civilians who have suffered from this technology. [8]

14. Drones May Interfere with Aircraft

Drones May Interfere with Aircraft

Drones have interfered with aircraft both in the air and on the ground. They have been sucked into plane engines and crashed into plane wings, and some have flown directly into the path of airplanes. Drones can be especially dangerous to helicopters, which fly at lower altitudes than airplanes. 

The FAA has reported more than 650 close encounters between drones and aircraft from November 2014 to August 2015 alone. [9]

15. Drone Accidents in the USA

Drone Accidents in the USA

Below is a list of drone accidents that have occurred in the USA:

  • In January 2015, a drone crashed on the White House lawn.
  • In 2016, a drone almost collided with an Air France Airbus A320. [10]
  • A drone crashed into the stands at the US Open tennis tournament in September 2015. [11]
  • A drone crashed into a crowd during a parade in Seattle in June 2015. [12]

According to Dronelife, there were around 385 drone accidents in the USA in 2017. [13]

16. DJI is the Largest Drone Provider in the US

DJI is the Largest Drone Provider in the US

Holding around 80% of the American market, the Chinese company DJI has become the largest drone provider in the US. DJI’s core product is the Phantom line of drones, which are perfect for hobbyists and professionals alike. They are the pioneer in this industry and one of the biggest players. [14]

17. Many Americans Own a Drone

Many Americans Own a Drone

Although drones have been around for a long time, it was not until recently that they became popular with the public. This is because, until recently, drones were used mainly by the military and law enforcement agencies. Nowadays, drones are used for different purposes such as inspection, recreation, and photography. 

In a survey by Philly by Air 2020, it was found that 8% of Americans own a drone. [15]

18. There are more Recreational Drones than Commercial Ones

There are more Recreational Drones than Commercial Ones

Recreational drones are typically marketed as RTF (ready to fly) and BNF (bind-and-fly). The former means that the drone comes with everything you need to start flying, and the latter means that the drone does not come with remote control. 

57.16% of the registered unmanned aerial vehicles with the FAA are for recreational use, while 42.84% are for commercial purposes.

19. Benefits in Agriculture

Benefits in Agriculture

Farmers were forced to monitor their crops from ground level using binoculars in the recent past. Drones have made it possible for farmers to survey and monitor their crops from a close range and at a low cost. It is now possible for farmers to detect areas that require fertilizer application and also identify specific plants that are infested with pests. 

Farmers could save about $1.3 billion a year by using drones to reduce the need for pesticides, fertilizers, and human labor. [16]

20. Drones Can Save a lot of Costs

Drones Can Save a lot of Costs

Drones enable companies to do their jobs much more cost-effectively than before. With the use of drones, companies can now send their UAVs instead of human beings to perform tasks such as inspecting cellular towers, bridges, or pipelines. This saves these companies a lot of money by eliminating the need for manpower.

Farm owners are charged $1,000 per hour for crop imaging by manned aircraft. Agricultural drones cost close to $1,000 each, while they can be utilized unlimited times.

References

  1. https://investinisrael.gov.il/HowWeHelp/downloads/UAVs%20and%20Drones.pdf
  2. https://www.statista.com/statistics/1221517/uas-drone-registrations-united-states/
  3. https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/register_drone/
  4. https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaellore/2022/02/21/drone-racing-league-doubles-broadcast-reach-thanks-to-growing-global-interest/
  5. https://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/28/us/white-house-drone.html
  6. https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/08/california-lawmakers-back-a-restraining-order-on-police-drones/379267/
  7. https://www.wilsoncenter.org/article/bin-ladens-death-cia-drones-played-their-part
  8. https://www.hrw.org/topic/terrorism-counterterrorism/targeted-killings-and-drones
  9. https://dronecenter.bard.edu/files/2015/12/12-11-Drone-Sightings-and-Close-Encounters.pdf
  10. https://www.cnbc.com/2016/03/04/french-airbus-plane-narrowly-avoids-collision-with-drone.html
  11. https://www.cnn.com/2015/09/04/us/us-open-tennis-drone-arrest/index.html
  12. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/falling-drone-knocks-woman-out-seattle-pride-parade/
  13. https://dronelife.com/2019/08/19/diving-into-the-faa-administrators-fact-book-why-drone-incidents-are-concerning-for-regulators/
  14. https://droneii.com/drone-market-shares-usa-after-china-usa-disputes
  15. https://www.phillybyair.com/blog/drone-study/
  16. https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/money/agriculture/2015/07/21/drones-farm-savings-agriculture-millions/30486487/